Search: Select Location Type:  
General Info
Home
Latest Info Updates
Advanced Search
Image Search
Site Statistics
About Us
Advertise Here
Support This Site
Contact Us
Press Clippings
Submit New Info
Drive-In Theaters
Drive-Ins by County
Open Drive-Ins
Drive-In History
Latest Drive-In Photos
Ohio Drive-In Theaters
Digital Restorations
Indoor Theaters
Theaters by County
Latest Theater Photos
Old Theaters
Old Theater Ads
Opera Houses
Movie Palaces
Amusement Parks
Amusement Parks
Latest Photos
Fairs
Fun Parks
Auto Racing
Motor Speedways
Latest Speedway Photos
Drag Racing
Latest Drag Strip Photos
John G's Dragstrip Pics
Cars and Drivers
Gas, Food and Lodging
Restaurants
Gas Stations
Motels
Tourist Cabins
Hotels
Boats
Hydroplane Racing
Ships
Cities and Towns
Schools
Vintage Detroit
Aerial Views
Ghost Towns
Train Depots
Post Offices
Downtown Views
Old Towns
Airports
Ballrooms
Interesting Architecture
Retail
Old Line Stores
Shopping Centers
Wonderland Mall
Car Dealers
Venues
Landmarks
Military
Industrial
Recreation and Sports
Lakes
Lighthouses
Campgrounds
Beaches
Resorts
Ski Resorts
Bowling Alleys
Golf
Roadside Michigan
Old Tourism Ads
Tourist Traps
Vintage Signs
Googie Architecture
Multimedia
Video Clips
Audio Clips
Resources
Links

Alpine Four Theatre


Address: 3219 Alpine Ave NW
City: Grand Rapids State: MI Zip: Phone: (616) 530-7469  
County: Kent
Notes:
View on Google Maps  
Open: Closed: 2001 Capacity:  
Owner: Jack Loeks Theatres
Number of visits to this page since Sept 2013: 12831
 
 

1/10/2004 - Cinema Tour
In 1970, John D. Jack Loeks, along with nine other stockholders, formed a new theatre circuit called Auto-Cine, Inc. with the intention of building small, automated twin theaters throughout western Michigan. The Alpine Theatre, which opened on September 23, 1970, was the second theater in this new circuit. The major premise in the twin theaters was to operate two auditoriums while using common box office, concessions and rest room facilities and a minimum of personnel.

A manager also handled the threading and starting of the films and the box office cashier doubled as a concession clerk. Projectors were outfitted to use larger reels, accommodating up to one hour each, instead of the usual 15 to 20 minutes. In an article in the Grand Rapids Press, Loeks says, What it amounts to is that we can set up two projectors, get the show started and have the whole operation complete itself without any manual assistance. Weve moved from the old hand-crank projector to almost complete automation.

Even some of the later advances still had the projectionist installing four to six reels for a feature film. Now only two are needed. The article continues to explain, The first projector even turns itself off and activates the second projector through a magnetic strip attached to the film. The only real problem is when a film tears or splits, which calls for immediate splicing, but modern movie film is such that it rarely occurs.

2/4/2003 - Chris Sallek
The Alpine 4 was demolished last year.
Alpine Four Theatre - MARQUEE AND ENTRANCE
MARQUEE AND ENTRANCE
Alpine Four Theatre - CONCESSION STAND
CONCESSION STAND
Alpine Four Theatre - PROJECTION
PROJECTION
Alpine Four Theatre - AUDITORIUM
AUDITORIUM
Alpine Four Theatre - AUDITORIUM BEING DISMANTLED
AUDITORIUM BEING DISMANTLED
Alpine Four Theatre - SIGN
SIGN

© 2020 Water Winter Wonderland. All rights reserved.  Over  48,217,072  Served